the-beauty-of-autumn
Photo of a colorful sunset over a distant mountain, will fall color in the trees in the middle ground and a beaver pond in the foreground. An abundant summer monsoon season and warm temperatures kept Colorado’s fall colors vibrant and extended the season late into October throughout the state. © Dawn Wilson
An abundant summer monsoon season and warm temperatures kept Colorado’s fall colors vibrant and extended the season late into October throughout the state. © Dawn Wilson

By Dawn Wilson, NANPA President

Where did fall go? How many of us have said that?

Autumn is probably a favorite season for most nature photographers. We love to capture the vibrant colors, the activity of mating animals, and fleeting visits of migrating birds. I know that is the case for me, and it was another great season in Colorado. Although the bighorn sheep rut has just started to ramp up and the deer rut is just around the corner, the colors are almost finished after a spectacular show across the Centennial State.

For those of you farther south and at lower elevations, or if you plan to travel to those locations, you still have plenty of opportunities to capture nature’s autumn hues and behaviors. Best of luck to you in your pursuit. 

Photo of an elk bull bugling. A satellite bull elk calls out with a shrill bugle to let cows know of his presence.  © Dawn Wilson
A satellite bull elk calls out with a shrill bugle to let cows know of his presence. © Dawn Wilson

The power of a photograph

Although this isn’t a new point in my monthly president’s message, I keep bringing up the power of a photograph because I am constantly amazed by the dedication of NANPA members to fight for conservation efforts of some of the most impacted animals. This month is no different.

It is almost November and that means Polar Bear Week is arriving.

A polar bear peaks over a rock on a snowy landscape in Churchill, Manitoba. © Dawn Wilson
A polar bear peaks over a rock on a snowy landscape in Churchill, Manitoba. © Dawn Wilson

Probably more so than any other animal, the polar bear symbolizes the challenges our world is facing because of climate change. Although not the only animal being affected by climate change, the polar bear certainly feels the effects with shrinking ice floes and shorter winters, the season they rely on for feeding on their primary food source of seals.

Celebrated each year from November 1 to 7, Polar Bear Week was established by Polar Bears International, the only conservation organization dedicated to polar bears. NANPA member Daniel Cox, who serves as a Photography Ambassador with Polar Bears International, wants everyone to know.

As quoted in a Q&A interview with Daniel by Polar Bears International, Daniel says, “Visual communications have always been vital for inspiring people to care about polar bears.”

Daniel also uses his visual content for his long-term project, the Arctic Documentary Project (ADP), to document changes taking place in the arctic and the scientists doing the positive work for this region.

So, think about the positive impact your photos can have on conservation efforts—from local habitats to animals in remote locations.

Learn more about Polar Bear Week and how you can get involved by visiting Polar Bears International. And check out Daniel’s ADP project.

You can also listen to Daniel’s interview on the Wild and Exposed Podcast, airing on Tuesday, November 2, 2021, about polar bears and photographing in Churchill.

Photo of three polar bears standing on all fours on a spit of ice with water on two sides. Polar bears wait for the ice to freeze along the shore of Hudson Bay in Churchill, Manitoba. © Dawn Wilson.
Polar bears wait for the ice to freeze along the shore of Hudson Bay in Churchill, Manitoba. © Dawn Wilson

Happy Halloween

And to close, I wish you and your family a happy Halloween. May you have a boo-tiful weekend enjoying this fall holiday.

Close up photo of an owl's head in profile with the words Happy Owl-oween.

Get involved

Want to get involved? Consider volunteering for a committee. There are numerous options available for a variety of interests. For more info about volunteering, visit http://www.nanpa.org/membership/built-by-volunteers/

Keep letting our membership and marketing teams know about your projects. There may be ways to share the news, like writing a blog or being interviewed on the podcast.

Do you have ideas for events or topics you want to learn more about? Reach out to us through our contact form

And be sure to recommend NANPA to your nature-loving friends and fellow photographers. Word of mouth is the number one way people learn about NANPA. New members can join online at nanpa.org.

“Whether it’s the best of times or the worst of times, it’s the only time we’ve got.” ~ Art Buchwald

Let’s stay positive. We are in this together.

Subscribe to Wild & Exposed in your favorite podcast app

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>